III

Narratives of African American Art and Identity

Charles Sebree

Untitled (Head) , 1952

Pastel and gouache

13.5" x 9.75"


Other Works

Previous Work Next Work


Untitled


Charles Sebree was one of many noted artists to emerge out of Chicago's black arts scene of the 1930s and 1940s. The network of support created through alliances with other artists and affiliations with such institutions as the South Side Community Arts Center and the Art Institute constituted a system through which black artists could forge a career for themselves in a landscape that remained largely hostile to their ambitions. After attending the Art Institute of Chicago, Sebree remained there and interacted with a group of artists centered in Chicago's South Side. The vitality of Chicago's black arts movement came to rival that of Harlem, and Sebree benefited from the involvement with colleagues such as Margaret Burroughs and Eldzier Cortor. Sebree also maintained a strong interest in the theater and often produced images of saltimbanques and harlequins. The Driskell Collection's untitled pastel features a harlequinesque head whose pale skin tone and large dark eyes are typical of Sebree's expressionist approach to the human visage.   A. L. C.

[TOP]


Home
Exhibition
Participants
Calendar/Venues
Education
David Driskell
Catalog
Bibliography
Related Sites
III. The Black Academy
I II III IV V A
Related Links

Charles Sebree biography

Charles Sebree on the web


Next Artist

Previous Artist Section I Home Next Artist